? ? ? Emory Giving 6 Month Old Infants H1N1 Test Vaccine

Pediatric H1N1 Vaccine Clinical Trial Opens At Emory

EMORY Health Sciences News – emoryhealthsciences.org

ATLANTA — Physician/researchers at Emory University and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta have begun vaccinating children in a clinical trial testing an investigational H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine along with the seasonal flu vaccine. Up to 650 children nationally will participate in the study, and Emory will enroll approximately 100 children, ages six months to 18 years.

The clinical trial is being conducted within the Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs), supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). At Emory, the VTEU is led by Mark Mulligan, MD, executive director of the Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center.

The study will examine the safety of and measure the body’s immune response to the H1N1 flu vaccine. In addition, it will help determine how and when the vaccine should be given with the seasonal flu vaccine to make it most effective. It also will analyze potential problems of giving the vaccines together, such as whether one vaccine will undermine the protective power of the other.

The answer is important because experts are predicting that both strains of influenza will circulate this fall and winter.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recently recommended all people from six months through 24 years of age receive the H1N1 influenza vaccine when it is available. In making its recommendations, the group considered current disease patterns and current trends that showed populations most at risk of serious illness, among other factors.

The panel recommended vaccinating children between six months and 18 years because of the high number of cases of H1N1 influenza infection in that age group. In addition, because they frequently are in school and day care, they are in close contact with each other, making it easier to spread disease.

The Emory pediatric clinical trial will be conducted at the Emory-Children’s Center. The trial is being led by Emory VTEU co-directors Harry Keyserling, MD, professor of pediatric infectious diseases at Emory School of Medicine and Paul Spearman, MD, chief research officer for Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and vice chair of research for Emory’s Department of Pediatrics, along with Allison Ross, MD, Emory assistant professor of pediatric infectious diseases.

The pediatric trial follows the launch of a VTEU-led adult clinical trial of the H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccines, which began at Emory’s Hope Clinic on Aug. 10 and will continue with followup visits for the next six weeks by a group of more than 170 volunteers.

“Because children and young adults are considered among the most vulnerable populations for new and emerging strains of influenza, such as the current H1N1 pandemic, it is critically important that we quickly and efficiently conduct these tests for a vaccine,” says Keyserling,

In addition to Emory, other sites for the H1N1 pediatric study, which is led by Saint Louis University, are Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati; University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston; and the University of Iowa.

The VTEUs were established in 1962 as a vital research component of the NIAID. The units conduct clinical trials for all infectious diseases other than HIV/AIDS. They have conducted hundreds of clinical studies over the past four decades. Emory was designated a VTEU site in 2007 and received a seven-year contract of approximately $23.7 million.

An important strength of the VTEUs is their ability to rapidly enroll large numbers of volunteers into trials and to immunize the volunteers in a safe, effective and efficient manner. This rapid-response capability is especially important for testing vaccines designed to combat pandemic influenza. Results are expected to be available weeks after the trials begin.

For more information on this clinical study visit http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00943202.

German health expert’s swine flu warning Does virus vaccine increase the risk of cancer?

The swine flu vaccine has been hit by new cancer fears after a German health expert gave a shock warning about its safety.

Dr. Wolfgang Wodarg is a politician and a specialist in lungs, hygiene and environmental medicine. He is the chairman of the health committee in the German parliament and European Council.

Lung specialist Wolfgang Wodarg has said that there are many risks associated with the vaccine for the H1N1 virus.

He has grave reservations about the firm Novartis who are developing the vaccine and testing it in Germany. The vaccination is injected “with a very hot needle”, Wodarg said.

The nutrient solution for the vaccine consists of cancerous cells from animals and “we do not know if there could be an allergic reaction”.

But more importantly, some people fear that the risk of cancer could be increased by injecting the cells.
The vaccine – as Johannes Löwer, president of the Paul Ehrlich Institute, has pointed out – can also cause worse side effects than the actual swine flu virus.

Wodrag also described people’s fear of the pandemic as an “orchestration”: “It is great business for the pharmaceutical industry,” he told the ‘Neuen Presse’.

Swine flu is not very different from normal flu. “On the contrary if you look at the number of cases it is nothing compared to a normal flu outbreak,” he added.

The chairman of the health committee in the European Council has urged for a careful and calm reaction to the virus.

Up until now, the producers of the vaccine did not know how many orders they would have by the autumn, but the German Government is now a guaranteed customer.

Dr. Wolfgang Wodarg is a politician and a specialist in lungs, hygiene and environmental medicine. He is the chairman of the health committee in the German parliament and European Council.
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Hidden Portal’ Concept Described: First Tunable Electromagnetic Gateway

ScienceDaily (Aug. 14, 2009)

While the researchers can’t promise delivery to a parallel universe or a school for wizards, books like Pullman’s Dark Materials and JK Rowling’s Harry Potter are steps closer to reality now that researchers in China have created the first tunable electromagnetic gateway.

The work is a further advance in the study of metamaterials, published in New Journal of Physics (co-owned by the Institute of Physics and German Physical Society).

In the research paper, the researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Fudan University in Shanghai describe the concept of a “a gateway that can block electromagnetic waves but that allows the passage of other entities” like a “‘hidden portal’ as mentioned in fictions.”

The gateway, which is now much closer to reality, uses transformation optics and an amplified scattering effect from an arrangement of ferrite materials called single-crystal yttrium-iron-garnet that force light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation in complicated directions to create a hidden portal.

Previous attempts at an electromagnetic gateway were hindered by their narrow bandwidth, only capturing a small range of visible light or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. This new configuration of metamaterials however can be manipulated to have optimum permittivity and permeability – able to insulate the electromagnetic field that encounters it with an appropriate magnetic reaction.

Because of the arrangement’s response to magnetic fields it also has the added advantage of being tunable and can therefore be switched on and off remotely.

Dr Huanyang Chen from the Physics Department at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has commented, “In the frequency range in which the metamaterial possesses a negative refraction index, people standing outside the gateway would see something like a mirror. Whether it can block all visible light depends on whether one can make a metamaterial that has a negative refractive index from 300 to 800 nanometres.”
Metamaterials, the area of physics research behind the possible creation of a real Harry Potter-style invisibility cloak, are exotic composite materials constructed at the atomic (rather than the usual chemical) level to produce materials with properties beyond those which appear naturally.

Journal reference:
1 Huanyang Chen, Che Ting Chan, Shiyang Liu and Zhifang Lin. A simple route to a tunable electromagnetic gateway. New Journal of Physics, 2009; (11) 083012 DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/11/8/083012
Adapted from materials provided by Institute of Physics.

MLA
Institute of Physics (2009, August 14). ‘Hidden Portal’ Concept Described: First Tunable Electromagnetic Gateway.

ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2009, from http://www.sciencedaily.com /releases/2009/08/090813083329.ht